Scarlett’s class Valentine’s Day card

Before I get all braggy about Scarlett’s adorable homemade Valentine’s, I want to make a few declarations.

One is a quote from my friend Wendy, who wrote the following on Facebook:

We are buying valentines and not making them this year. Because let’s be honest: the kids who receive them don’t give a shit.

The second is from another friend Asha, co-author of Minimalist Parenting and founder of Parent Hacks, who said:

Minimalist Parenting quote on Valentine's Day

While I totally agree with both of my sensible, down-to-earth friends, making things with my kids is one my personal passions. It doesn’t have to be yours. So while I support everyone who has other things to focus on, this is something I actually look forward to. Please don’t mock or accuse me of setting the bar too high. I promise: I am under-achieving in other areas.

When Pinterest first became something I was looking at on a daily basis, over a year ago, I was charmed by Kristen’s Valentine’s Day project, and filed it away (virtually) for the future. Over the weekend I pitched the idea to Scarlett, showing her pictures of Kristen’s kids, and she was excited about it. (Julian wanted nothing to do with it.)

First, I had her pose for a photo with a blank wall behind her. She needed to hold her fist out away from her body so that there would be space for the lollipop. Then I used my new favorite app Over to add text on top of the photo. (Seriously, check out this app. It will make you feel fancy in an instant.)

valentine-over

Next I printed them 4×6 on a nice stock of paper, 2-up on a page. valentines-card-kindergarten

Then we cut them out, used a hole puncher to put holes at the top and bottom of her fist in the picture, and finally, she slid the lollipops through.

valentines-day-card-kindergarten

(Note that we skipped the laborious process of having a Kindergartner write each of her classmate’s names on a Valentine. I did that with Julian when he was in Pre-K with a list of 23 classmates and it was painful.)

In summary, here’s what you need:

  1. Card stock paper
  2. A printer with functioning ink cartridges (I find maintaining this to be challenging)
  3. A child who is willing to pose until you get it right
  4. A blank wall
  5. A way to put text over an image (markers work of course, but again, I recommend the app)
  6. Scissors
  7. Hole puncher
  8. Lollipops

If you relate more to Asha than to me in this moment, consider her upcoming class. It’s free!