Try this with me: Smoothies in squeeze pouches for big kids

When I’m an old lady, the way 80-year olds will be able to tell that I’m 90 is because I’ll mention that when I purchased baby food, it came in jars.

“Jars?” they’ll say, “No. When we were young mothers, baby food came in pouches!”

“Not until 2009,” I’ll remind them. Back then, baby food was in glass jars and cell phones were for calling people.  (Kidding!)

Now that pouches are the norm and reusable versions have hit the market, enabling DIY baby food makers to enjoy the convenience of a pouch, what will become of these kids who suck all their food through plastic spouts? I know Heather worried about this when Sawyer refused all non-squeezable eating experiences.

Idea: Squeeze pouch smoothies

As I was learning about Squeeze Ems, a reusable pouch whose entire top screws off to make cleaning slightly more bearable, I noticed that their marketing materials showed pictures of school aged children using the product.

“What are those big kids eating?” I asked the salespeople. I was trying to understand why 1st graders needed pureed food in a pouch.

The answer is one that I actually got excited about. An employee I spoke to suggested that a smoothie could be poured into the pouch, frozen, and then would thaw out for consumption in the lunchbox.

I do make frequent smoothies, and much like those baby food combos that sneak kale or spinach in amongst the peaches and berries, the drinks I make at home are designed to deliver salad ingredients into my kids systems without protest. I haven’t tried this yet, but I think it’s a great idea: I’ll make a smoothie for myself, pour two portion into reusable pouches, and toss them in the freezer. The next day, my husband will pack them in the kids lunches.

Do you think it’ll work? Should I order a set of Squeeze Ems for smoothies?

squeeze-pouch

{amazon affiliate link to Squeeze ‘Ems}

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RookieMoms.com co-founder Whitney lives with her husband, son, and daughter in the San Francisco Bay Area where she writes about parenting, crafts, and activities that moms can do with babies in tow. She and Heather also publish 510Families.com, a site for East Bay parents and are the authors of The Rookie Mom's Handbook and Stuff Every Mom Should Know.

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